AVRA

AVRA ABIN#19-062-4 – F, 3 Years

Foster Dog Name: Avra   AB# 19-062-4

Gender: Female, spayed

Age: Approximately 3 years

Size/weight: About 40 lbs. 

Color: Blue Belton (black and white)  

Breed: English setter

Socialization/training: Avra was a perfect little lady at the vet’s office. She got oohs from admirers, and she went over and greeted people politely. She’s been fine with company. Avra is doing well on sit, not well on stay, and we’re working on down. 

Good with children: Our grandchildren haven’t been here, but she might accidentally knock over a younger child. I can’t see her hurting a child or anyone on purpose. Avra does not have a soft mouth and when she takes a ball to play or a treat, one needs to be aware of that.  We’ve been working on taking treats gently, and I see some improvement.  She gets very excited playing ball and gets rough, so I would be very cautious letting a child give her a ball. It isn’t done with any meanness—just excitement to play.  

Good with dogs: Yes, she is very good with other dogs. She loves to play, play, play.  She can overwhelm them, and when corrected she takes it very well and backs off. She is very good-natured and accepting. When she gets overly excited or anxious, she gets a bit amorous with the other dogs, and it’s hard to get her redirected. I did notice that behavior lessen as she got more secure, and now she seldom bothers them. 

Good with cats: I was going to say she gets fixated and chases them, nothing at all aggressive, but just curious and wanting to play. Then last night she was on the couch with one of our kitties only a few feet away, and she was great. She hasn’t hurt ours even when she was chasing and barking at them. At her first foster home in Greece, she made friends with the resident cat immediately. I may just have grouchy, hissy kitties.  

Leash trained: She pulls hard. We did get her a harness and that seems to help some. Avra needs practice with a leash, or someone who is better than I am working with her. She loves her walks and gets very excited about all the birds. 

House trained: Yes, she has done very well. She has had only 1 accident, and that was my fault when I didn’t see her by the door. Her crate is always dry in the morning.  When I let her out, I tell her to go potty, and she goes immediately. She loves to get all the excited praises and claps. 

Crate trained: She does very well at night in a crate with no barking. She would rather not go in, but go in she does, and she settles very well after I give her a treat and turn out the light. She waits patiently, just wagging her tail, till we let her out to potty in the morning.  Her crate is always dry. I have had to crate her for an hour or so during the day a few times, and she’s been fine. But with her energy level, she can’t be crated every day all day. 

Activity level: Avra has a very high energy level, but as I type this she is napping at my feet. When she first gets up in the morning she runs and runs, but as the day goes on, she slows down. When we first brought her home, she was so anxious she panted and ran for hours, but as the days have passed, she has gotten more mellow. She is very energetic in the morning after being crated all night, but after a few hours of exercise she settles right down. She needs a yard to run, run, run in, and then she needs lots of cuddles, love, and a comfy place to nap, preferably by her person. Although she is a very high energy dog, I wouldn’t want anyone to think that initial frenetic activity level is her norm. She will calm when she feels secure and settled. 

Fence: Avra needs a fence. Ours is 5 feet, and she hasn’t tried to get out. She loves to run, trying to catch those elusive birds, but when she comes in the house, she’s such a good girl. With her energy level, trying to provide her with enough exercise without a fence would be difficult and not fair to her. 

Behavior:  This beautiful little Greek girl loves and needs to be loved.  She is so hungry to be touched and hugged.  If Avra isn’t out running, she is right where her person is. She follows me everywhere like a little shadow.   Her favorite napping place is in our laps or at our feet. Avra loves chasing balls. She brings them almost back, but then runs wanting us to chase. She finally lets us have the ball, and it begins all over again. Again, she does play rough but hasn’t hurt us. She jumps up when she gets excited, but it’s a light jump. We are working on that. When she wants to come in the house, she runs circles outside the door. She loves chasing the birds in the yard.  

Medical history: Avra is healthy and up to date on her shots, heartworm, flea and tick preventative. She is microchipped and her number has been verified to be correct. 

Avra comes from Greece where Leishmaniasis is endemic. She tested negative in Greece, but the parasite can remain dormant for years, so would-be adopters must be wiling to commit to annual testing for the next 7 years. The test needs to be sent to a special lab, but any regular vet can draw the blood and send it to the lab. The cost of the test varies but is usually around $120 to $150. 

Foster comments: Avra is an absolute sweetheart. She was found running alone, probably abandoned. She so needs and deserves to be loved and accepted in her own forever home. She has so much love to give in return. She has sparkling dark brown eyes, and a very freckled face that gets the cutest expressions.  She has a beautiful coat with gorgeous ticking on her legs and shoulders.   She will be a wonderful addition to a loving active home.                               

Adoption Fee: $300.00

Foster Location: Fort Morgan, CO 

Volunteer transport can be arranged in the Continental US within a 1,000 mile distance between adopters & foster home. Typically, we are able to transport your adopted dog to within 2 hours of your home. *Dogs can be adopted outside the 1000 mile transport distance; however, adopters must be willing to either fly their adopted dog, drive to a location within the 1000 mile transport range, or make independent transport arrangements for their adopted dog. Transports to far West states, from Eastern states, may have additional restriction